Website review picks, Dan’s 12-1 seminar

January 22, 2010

Once you’ve checked with Dan, put up your choices as comments here.

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Website review picks, Dan’s 11-12 seminar

January 22, 2010

Once you’ve checked with Dan, put up your choices as comments here.


Website review picks, Helen’s 2-3 seminar

January 22, 2010

Once you’ve checked with Helen, put up your choices as comments here.


Website review picks, Helen’s 12-1 seminar

January 22, 2010

Once you’ve checked with Helen, put up your choices as comments here.


Website review picks, Helen’s 11-12 seminar

January 22, 2010

Once you’ve checked them with Helen, put up your sites as comments here.


Website Reviews

January 22, 2010

Over the coming weeks you need to be identifying websites to review. Have a think for a moment about how you’re going to do this. Ask yourself some questions: what does Dan want to achieve by this? will it be enough to identify just the first few sites that you can find, or to Google ‘Britain Second World War? how can I use this to enhance my research and writing for my final essay?

I want to build up an annotated database that researchers can use to help pick their way through the confused mass of WW2 sites on the web. You are going to contribute to that, and help to create a lasting good from this course.

To do that, you are going to need to be adventurous and commonsensical in your searching. It’s fairly easy to find some Second World War bibliography or links sites, and nearly every website you visit will have some useful links highlighted. Spend some time going through these, and try to pick a variety of sites – think about who has set them up, what their purpose is, and how we can use them as historians. This task expects you to explore. But at the same time, you need to think ‘how useful is this site, and what will the markers think of the choice I have made?’ Try to impress us with what you choose and how you use it.

It is absolutely fine for you to pick sites which relate to your chosen topic for your research essay In fact, that would seem very sensible to me. But use the opportunity to pick a range of different sources.

Once you’ve chosen the sites, you need to do two things. First, check them with us – this is for your benefit, we’d like to be able to advise you if we think a site won’t be helpful to you. Second, once we’ve approved them, put up your choices as comments in the individual seminar posts above this one. Remember, you can’t pick the same sites as others in your seminar group.


Wartime deaths

January 22, 2010

As you’ll have seen from lots of my posts and lecture comments, one of the topics that fascinates me is the location, scale and representation of death in wartime Britain. The numbers of those who died are actually hard to ascertain – the Registrar General recorded the number of those who’d died due to ‘operations of war’, but what about those who died in industrial accidents resulting from the mobilisation of the workforce? What, for example, about the casualties from the catastrophic explosion at Fauld, the scars of which are still visible on the landscape? What about the railwaymen who died in this explosion at Soham? It’s notable that both occurred in 1944, when munitions were being built up for the final effort in Europe. But if we count these as ‘wartime deaths’, then we also need to factor in all those children who survived because of increased nourishment thanks to national feeding schemes and the departure of men to war.